Chilean philosophy course comes to a close …

Thanks to the good folks at Universidad Gabriela Mistral, and my good friend Pablo Maillet, my short extension course, a series of lectures on “God and Philosophy,” came to a successful close this week. A short description and news story from UGM can be found here. The Spanish text reads: Yesterday saw the successful conclusion … Continue reading Chilean philosophy course comes to a close …

The Principle of Least Action (Chile)

The following presentation is another entry in my attempts to understand the principle of least action from a Neo-Aristotelian perspective. It was presented at First Chilean Conference on the Philosophy of Physics. In the presentation, I engage the views of Vladislav Terekhovich and Vassilis Livanios, who have both provided keen counterpoints to dispositionalist approaches to … Continue reading The Principle of Least Action (Chile)

The Principle of Least Action at the ACPA

The following is a presentation given at the recent meeting of the American Catholic Philosophical Association. It is a part of an ongoing project on the principle of least action, and this version will be incorporated in some manner in a longer paper, hopefully by the end of this year. Comments are most welcome.   … Continue reading The Principle of Least Action at the ACPA

The Impossible Prudence of the Robotic Doctor

Michel Accad, physician and author of the blog Alert & Oriented—as well as various academic works, including an article on my reading list about hylomorphism and cell theory—writes in a quæstione disputatae with Darrel Francis in The BMJ against the reign of “evidence based medicine.” What is EBM, why does Accad argue against it, and what light might a classically inspired philosophy … Continue reading The Impossible Prudence of the Robotic Doctor

Hans Jonas and the test of self-reference

  Among the many tools of the mind at the philosopher’s disposal, the test of self-reference is one of the most fundamental, subtle, and direct. I have utilized it myself in past arguments (here). In summary, the test is one of retorsion: you turn back the meaning of what a speaker says or claims upon … Continue reading Hans Jonas and the test of self-reference

Dignity in a cold, dark universe

The following is the abstract of a paper soon to be under review. If you would like a personal copy, please e-mail me here. Is Personal Dignity Possible Only If We Live in a Cosmos? The Catholic Church has increasingly relied upon the principle of human dignity as part of its evangelical mission in modern times. Catholic … Continue reading Dignity in a cold, dark universe

Conference version of “Reconsidering Abstraction from Matter”

For those who have better things to do than read the 22pp version of my De Koninck abstraction paper, what follows is a slightly edited version of the 15-minute version of the paper which I delivered at the recent III Congreso Internacional de Filosofía Tomista. St. Thomas and Modern Natural Science: Reconsidering Abstraction from Matter 1. … Continue reading Conference version of “Reconsidering Abstraction from Matter”

The Empty Brain

The effects of the Cartesian view of human nature permeate our scientific thinking to an impressive degree. This is all the more a paradox since "the isolation of the mind from the body entails an isolation of the mind from the world" and hence the isolation of the knower from what he wants to know. The resulting … Continue reading The Empty Brain

Street-Level Scientism

Comments are welcome on these initial thoughts concerning everyday scientism. An excerpt: If science cannot be the only type of certain knowledge, why is it so commonly taken to be such? This disposition to accept science, without discretion, as the sole or ruling source of knowledge is a common malaise. It is street-level scientism. Street-level … Continue reading Street-Level Scientism