On health as a common good

It seems that health is not a common good, because health characterizes an individual. In scholastic terms, it is a qualitative accident of a living substance, an organism. Thus: An individual’s life and health are particular goods, not common goods. It is an obvious metaphysical truth that my health and my life can only be … Continue reading On health as a common good

Silencing the bells of Nagasaki

Funeral Mass near the ruins of the Urakami Cathedral, held on November 23, 1945, for the victims of the atomic bomb. (WikiMedia) Seventy-five years ago today, the USAAF B-29 Bockscar dropped one of the last bombs of the Second World War in the Urakami valley, on the industrial port city of Nagasaki, Japan. Tens of … Continue reading Silencing the bells of Nagasaki

The Question of Catholic Integralism: An Internet Genealogy

[N.b.: Updated, 2020 May 31: Future posts about integralism are in the works, so I hope this will be my last update to this one. I’ve added a Public Discourse essay that was overlooked by the first version.] The purpose of this post is to recall the contours of the debate about Catholic integralism that … Continue reading The Question of Catholic Integralism: An Internet Genealogy

Something ever new under the sun

From Fr. Ronald Knox, a sermon entitled “The Risen Christ,” from Pastoral and Occasional Sermons. There is nothing new under the sun. — Ecclesiastes 1:9 Behold, I make all things new. — Apocalypse 31:5 When Easter comes, the Church delights to remind herself of that newness which is in the risen Christ. [...] We are beginning … Continue reading Something ever new under the sun

Review on Thomistica

Over at Thomistica is my review of Fr. David Alcalde’s Cosmology Without God? Here’s a brief excerpt: In his monograph, Cosmology Without God? The Problematic Theology Inherent in Modern Cosmology—a revised version of his doctoral dissertation written under Michael Hanby at the Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family at the Catholic University of … Continue reading Review on Thomistica

“Those Two Roads” at Thomistica

At Thomistica.net an essay of mine is now available: “Those Two Roads: How a Natural Philosophical Solution to a Difficulty about Motion Serves Thomistic Theology.” It was given at one of the Sacra Doctrina Project’s satellite sessions at the most recent conference of the American Catholic Philosophical Association. The essay discusses the Aristotelian idea that motion, … Continue reading “Those Two Roads” at Thomistica

New translation of Hugon now available

Now available from Cluny Media, the fourth volume of the Thomist Tradition Series, is my translation of Fr. Édouard Hugon’s book Mary, Full of Grace. Order it on Amazon here, and it’s also available through Cluny’s website. From book’s back cover: Mary, Full of Grace is a summary Mariology—a comprehensive study of the Blessed Virgin Mary … Continue reading New translation of Hugon now available

It’s Still A Hard Saying

In the sixth chapter of St. John's Gospel, Jesus’ hearers react to his teaching on the Eucharist with the following words: “This saying is hard, and who can hear it?” (John 6:60) Remember that those murmurers were among his own disciples, not just members of the crowd. Eventually, they depart: “After this many of his … Continue reading It’s Still A Hard Saying

The Eucharist and the Scandal of Particularity

“In some real sense it is true to say: ignorance of ontology is ignorance of Christ,” argues a recent Christological treatise. If this is true, then by extension it is also true of the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist. The harmony of faith and reason demand that our knowing Christ in the Sacrament … Continue reading The Eucharist and the Scandal of Particularity